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Arbritration FAQ Mediation

If I, as mediator, give my opinion in a dispute, doesn’t that mean I am biased?

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My Opinion – Bias?

 

If I, as mediator, give my opinion in a dispute, doesn’t that mean I am biased?

Absolutely not!  I as mediator form opinions on many issues for many reasons.

One of the primary things I do as mediator is to help you to evaluate the pros and cons of your position in a dispute and provide you with the information you need in order to make an educated decision about resolution. My opinion is critical to this process and will likely be based on the totality of the information from both sides, not merely that of one party. Although because of confidentiality, I may not be able to disclose the information to you, having an opinion from an unbiased source, based on such information may be very helpful to you in making choices.

Ken Strongman, MediatorAbout the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.

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Arbritration FAQ Mediation

I want to resolve the dispute, but the other party’s demands are unreasonable. What should I do?

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I want to resolve the dispute, but the other party’s demands are unreasonable. What should I do?

I want to resolve the dispute, but the other party’s demands are unreasonable. What should I do?  Don’t let yourself get stuck refusing to make what you believe is a reasonable settlement offer or demand based on your opinion that the opposing party has made an unreasonable one! Instead, attempt to resolve disputes based on your reasonable evaluation. It is my job as mediator to assess, based on all the information presented, “the realm of the reasonable” in the context of potential resolution of each specific dispute and to bring the parties to that range.

Ken Strongman, MediatorAbout the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.

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Arbritration FAQ Mediation

I’ve been in mediation and there was so much conflict that nothing got done. Wouldn’t I be better off just going to court?

court
Going to court.

I’ve been in mediation and there was so much conflict that nothing got done. Wouldn’t I be better off just going to court?

This is an option, but you may not resolve your dispute. Mediation is not about coming to the table as friends to avoid conflict and confrontation, as many professionals would have you believe. It’s about resolving disputes. Inherent in the concept of “dispute” is conflict and without confrontation of that conflict head-on, there may be settlement, but there may be no true resolution.

In some disputes, settlement itself may be enough, but in most, in addition to the economic or performance related issues, there is an undercurrent of emotion, and both sides often perceive themselves as a “victim” in the dispute. Those complaining of a wrong see themselves as the aggrieved party. Those responding, because they often believe they are involved in the dispute needlessly, feel abused by the claimant and the dispute process, particularly when facing the burdens of litigation.

You may wish to avoid confrontation at the outset but may find, as the process continues, that you want to express yourself to other parties. Make sure you talk to me as your mediator to allow this flexibility. In a truly meaningful mediation, in addition to providing valuable information to you about the dispute, I will guide you safely through confrontation of the conflict to resolution.

Remember that Mediation is Conflict at its best.

Ken Strongman, MediatorAbout the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.

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FAQ Mediation

What do I do in a mediation?

FAQ Mediation San Francisco
FAQ Mediation San Francisco

As your mediator, I am neither your friend nor foe.   All too many come into the mediation anticipating that they will “win over” me or that I will advocate on their behalf. Often when this fails to happen, and it should fail to happen, they treat the mediator as an adversary. This does not help them reach resolution and often creates a situation where the entire process is undermined, preventing resolution even where one is possible.

As mediator I am on neither side of the dispute.  I am an impartial third party that wants the parties to resolve their dispute.  This means that while I may see both sides of the dispute, and may for many reasons, develop a professional opinion or gut instinct as to the reasonableness of the positions and the likely outcome of potential litigation, your mediator should have no stake in the outcome and should not be on your side or any other.

The only way for me, as your mediator, to be an effective problem solver is to maintain my credibility and objectivity through neutrality. Help me by understanding this and supporting my position of neutrality.  Not only will this help me to resolve your dispute, but doing so will help you to understand and trust my motive in giving an opinion, regardless of whether it is favorable or not, and to gain confidence in the information I am bringing to you, both of which will ultimately lead to higher satisfaction with the resolution chosen.

Ken StrongmanAbout the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.

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Arbritration FAQ Mediation

FAQ: What is the Comprehensive Mediation Agreement?

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Comprehensive Agreement

FAQ: What is the Comprehensive Mediation  Agreement?

In order to ensure all parties understand the status and implications involved, a comprehensive Mediation Agreement dealing with issues such as confidentiality, admissibility and privilege in relation to documentation and information exchanged must be agreed in advance. The Mediation Agreement will also deal with the costs of the mediation including the mediator’s fees and will establish how these costs are to be shared between the parties. An appropriately qualified mediator will usually provide a draft Meditation Agreement and it can be amended to suit the parties wishes before being signed by each of the parties and the mediator.

This is standard practice for all of my mediations.  My mediation agreement includes the time and location of the mediation; any known apparent conflicts; the rules of confidentiality; due dates for briefing the dispute and payment of fees.  Generally, the fee is split between the parties but this can be modified by the parties.

Ken_Strongman_003smAbout the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.