Who should attend the mediation?

Golden Gate Bridge, Marin Headlands.
Who should attend the mediation?

 Who Should Attend the Mediation?

 All parties involved in the interactions that gave rise to the dispute should be involved in the mediation. This helps me, as mediator; crystallize with the parties exactly what happened. A party may also be more candid with me when they know they may be faced with others who know exactly what happened.

It is essential that all insurance carriers are represented at the mediation and that they have full authority to settle the dispute.

In addition, for parties to a dispute, letting go of emotion is often critical to the ability to resolve a dispute. An acknowledgement of damage or expression of remorse from an opposing party or a participant in the interactions that gave rise to the dispute (without any admission of liability, of course) can make the difference. This can’t usually be done by anyone but those personally involved in the dispute.

Bringing your witnesses (party, corporate or independent) to a mediation (even if they spend all their time in a separate room), can accomplish some important things, particularly when the facts are in dispute or emotions run high. Meeting and speaking with witnesses allows a mediator to provide you with an opinion as to their credibility and the likelihood of their being persuasive with an arbitrator, judge or jury.

Every situation is different and you should talk to me, your mediator to see what would be appropriate for your mediation.

Ken StrongmanAbout the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.

By Ken Strongman

As a full-time, Mediator and Arbitrator since 2004, Ken’s overarching purpose is to leave the disputing parties in a better position than when they came to him. Ken works to unite people into purposeful and unified directions, actions, and efforts by getting under surface appearances. By doing so, he facilitates the parties in developing their unique solutions. Disputes addressed include business, securities, construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, employment, environment, energy, and trusts & estates.