Persuade using two-sided refutational messages

 Arbritration, Conflict Resolution, Mediation  Comments Off on Persuade using two-sided refutational messages
Feb 092015
 

persuade others using two-sided refutational messages

persuade others using two-sided refutational messages

Persuade Others Using Two-sided Refutational Messages

Refutational messages: what are they and how to persuade others using two-sided refutational messages? Persuasion is the process of changing minds. Persuasion is an everyday part of human discourse. It is used by salesmen, parents, teachers, and many others – basically all of us. Persuasion in mediation is a two-way street. Long before you try to influence another to moderate their demands or consider the other side’s point of view, chances are good that they will have tried to convince you to their position.

It’s my experience in order to be an effective mediator, I must engage in various forms of persuasion. I do not engage in coercive or manipulative persuasion practices by which pressure brought to bear on reluctant participants to get a settlement. I do use a range of potential mediator interventions to help the parties resolve deeply held or competitively bargained differences. *

Two-side Refutational Messages

The basic concept is to present two sides and reasons one side is more persuasive.
This is reality testing. I do it later in the day or mediation session.

It is a road map for evaluating the case. It is also where I earn my mediator’s fee.
It incorporates both sides with lots of detail. What would happen if you went to court?
What would the court do in the end?

It is by its very nature evaluative. At some point during the mediation session, I am always asked what I think the valuation of the conflict. Putting it another way, who do I think will win in court. I do not do this early in the session because I want the parties to see both sides of the issue and hopefully persuade them as to the just outcome.

While doing it later in the session, it shows both sides that I have listened all day and that I know what each side thinks and what their real needs are to settle the case. Many times, both sides have worked hard to come to an agreement and I do not have to lead them through this process. In the end it is persuasion by reviewing the pros and cons of both sides of the issue

How Does This Work

It is a form of direct persuasion with cogent detailed analysis of both perspectives, and conclusion as to which perspective is stronger. My conclusions do have an impact. As a disinterested third party this is what I think of your case. Naturally, I do couch it in terms of my experience and expertise and that a jury might look at it slightly differently. Faced with a conclusion by some one else is a mind altering event.

Effectiveness

1. Messages with explicit overall conclusions are significantly more persuasive than messages without conclusions.
2. Messages with more conclusions and reasoning are significantly more persuasive than messages with generalized conclusions.
3. Two sided messages are more persuasive that one-sided messages

Why they work

Arguments that reveal their sources and are specific are significantly more credible persuasive than their less explicit counterparts.

*Stark, James H. and Frenkel, Douglas N., Changing Minds: The Work of Mediators and Empirical Studies of Persuasion (2013). Ohio State Journal on Dispute Resolution, Vol. 28, No. 2, Pg. 263, 2013; U of Penn Law School, Public Law Research Paper No. 11-07

**Why the picture of Cross Country runners?  It takes a lot of persuasion to get them to the finish line. 

Ken_Strongman_003sm About the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.

How to persuade others using rhetorical questions?

 Arbritration, Conflict Resolution, Mediation  Comments Off on How to persuade others using rhetorical questions?
Jan 052015
 

Ken Strongman xc03 rhetorical

persuade using rhetorical questions

How to persuade others using rhetorical questions? Persuasion is the process of changing minds. Persuasion is an everyday part of human discourse. It is used by salesmen, parents, teachers, and many others – basically all of us. Persuasion in mediation is a two-way street. Long before you try to influence another to moderate their demands or consider the other side’s point of view, chances are good that they will have tried to convince you to their position.

It’s my experience in order to be an effective mediator, I must engage in various forms of persuasion. I do not engage in coercive or manipulative persuasion practices by which pressure brought to bear on reluctant participants to get a settlement. I do use a range of potential mediator interventions to help the parties resolve deeply held or competitively bargained differences. *

Rhetorical Questions

Rhetorical Questions are questions that strongly suggest the answer. I almost never use this form of persuasion in mediation. If I do it at all, it is towards the end of the day.

How they work

Rhetorical Questions are a form of direct persuasion. As a Mediator, I become an “agent of reality” in order to sow doubt and attitude change.

Effectiveness

Not effective because it increases the perception of pressure resulting in the mediator loosing the trust of the parties. Thinking therefore stops. That is why I very seldom use rhetorical questions.

Why they don’t work

It increases the impression of pressure from the questioner. Questions are seen as less knowledgeable than previously in the mediation. The parties question the mediator’s knowledge base. It makes me appear that I don’t know what is going on, which is not true. It does reduce message acceptance. Furthermore, it interferes with message elaboration and self-persuasion.

*Stark, James H. and Frenkel, Douglas N., Changing Minds: The Work of Mediators and Empirical Studies of Persuasion (2013). Ohio State Journal on Dispute Resolution, Vol. 28, No. 2, Pg. 263, 2013; U of Penn Law School, Public Law Research Paper No. 11-07

**Why the picture of Cross Country runners?  It takes a lot of pursuasion to get them to the finish line. 

Ken Strongman, Mediator About the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.

How to persuade others by using multiple explanation analysis.

 Arbritration, Conflict Resolution, Mediation  Comments Off on How to persuade others by using multiple explanation analysis.
Dec 082014
 

Ken Strongman xc02 multiple explanation analysis

multiple explanation analysis

How to persuade others by using multiple explanation analysis. Persuasion is the process of changing minds. Persuasion is an everyday part of human discourse. It is used by salesmen, parents, teachers, and many others – basically all of us. Persuasion in mediation is a two-way street. Long before you try to influence another to moderate their demands or consider the other side’s point of view, chances are good that they will have tried to convince you to their position.

It’s my experience in order to be an effective mediator, I must engage in various forms of persuasion. I do not engage in coercive or manipulative persuasion practices by which pressure brought to bear on reluctant participants to get a settlement. I do use a range of potential mediator interventions to help the parties resolve deeply held or competitively bargained differences. *

Multiple explanation analysis or Why I could lose

How it works
This is a form of self persuasion. The party explores alternative theories the justices could apply to the case to change the outcome. Basically, the question is how they might lose the argument.

When working with people to resolve their conflict in mediation, I keep asking simple questions on how they intend to prove their case. I start in the beginning, asking what the true cause of the conflict is and how that will be viewed by a jury. Many times we are offended by some thing only to find out that it is very hard to prove and may in fact not be illegal.

Why it works
By examining every aspect of a case it overcomes single explanation bias. There might be many explanations for what happened and why it happened. In many disputes that I have resolved, they would never have become a major conflict, if someone had just picked up the phone and asked, “What do you mean by this.”

*Stark, James H. and Frenkel, Douglas N., Changing Minds: The Work of Mediators and Empirical Studies of Persuasion (2013). Ohio State Journal on Dispute Resolution, Vol. 28, No. 2, Pg. 263, 2013; U of Penn Law School, Public Law Research Paper No. 11-07

**Why the picture of Cross Country runners?  It takes a lot of pursuasion to get them to the finish line. 

Ken Strongman, Mediator About the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.

How to persuade others with counter attitudinal advocacy.

 Arbritration, Conflict Resolution, Mediation  Comments Off on How to persuade others with counter attitudinal advocacy.
Nov 102014
 

CPHS XC: CIF counter attitudinal advocacy.

counter attitudinal advocacy.

How to persuade others with counter attitudinal advocacy. Persuasion is the process of changing minds. Persuasion is an everyday part of human discourse. It is used by salesmen, parents, teachers, and many others – basically all of us. Persuasion in mediation is a two-way street. Long before you try to influence another to moderate their demands or consider the other side’s point of view, chances are good that they will have tried to convince you to their position.

It’s my experience in order to be an effective mediator, I must engage in various forms of persuasion. I do not engage in coercive or manipulative persuasion practices by which pressure brought to bear on reluctant participants to get a settlement. I do use a range of potential mediator interventions to help the parties resolve deeply held or competitively bargained differences. *

Counter attitudinal Advocacy

This is a fancy term to essentially have one side give the arguments of their opposition, thereby inducing the parties to consider the other perspectives. It is a powerful way to change minds. By making the argument for the other side, they must articulate the other side’s perspective. It creates cognitive dissidence cracking open the thinking process.

How it works

It is a form of self –persuasion. In mediation, I often start out in a private meeting with one side and ask them to tell me what the other side wants to accomplish. Simply put: why are they here? It forces them to set aside their own needs and desires and attempt to look at the problem from the others perspective. Can there be an innocent interpretation of their actions and perspectives? I have the same conversation with the other side when we meet. Together both start to see the problem from different perspectives.

Effectiveness

It works to create a change in attitude. With deeply held beliefs, changes are slow and incremental. By focusing on a different point of view, attitudes do change. I use this process extensively in mediations where there in an on going relationship such as construction and technology industries.

Why it works

When we regard the others persuasive arguments as our “own” we reduce our psychological resistance. Technically, it overcomes single explanation bias. Many times I’ve seen the light bulb go on and real progress is made towards resolving the conflict.

For an experienced Mediator to help negotiate a resolution to your dispute contact Ken Strongman. Here.

*Stark, James H. and Frenkel, Douglas N., Changing Minds: The Work of Mediators and Empirical Studies of Persuasion (2013). Ohio State Journal on Dispute Resolution, Vol. 28, No. 2, Pg. 263, 2013; U of Penn Law School, Public Law Research Paper No. 11-07

**Why the picture of Cross Country runners?  It takes a lot of persuasion to get them to the finish line. 

 Ken StrongmanAbout the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.

FAQ: When Does Mediation Really Start?

 Arbritration, FAQ, Mediation  Comments Off on FAQ: When Does Mediation Really Start?
Aug 182014
 

FAQ_Mediation Golden Gate - start

When does mediation start?

When does mediation start?

People tend to believe that mediation begins when all concerned parties meet in the mediation room and take their places at the mediation table.  Mediation begins when disputing parties agree to participate in a private mediation or when a Judge suggests that they attempt mediation.

Pre-mediation

This pre-mediation phase is frequently overlooked and underestimated for the potential power it has over the outcome of a mediation session.

Preparation is the Key

Would any one perform in a play without holding a rehearsal?  The answer obviously is “No.”  Yet, people often go into mediation with very little or no preparation for what could be one of the most important days of their lives.  This is even more significant when you consider that decisions made during mediation can have critical, life-changing effects for not only the disputants, but for their companies as well.  Therefore parties should not overlook this phase and begin detailed preparations for the mediation.

Ken_Strongman_003smAbout the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.

Aug 122014
 

Angel Island SP qualifications

qualifications of a good mediator

I have often been asked what the qualifications of a good mediator are. My answer is self serving but true. I have worked hard to make sure that I am the best qualified to mediate a case. Remember it is not bragging if true. So as to not bore you with all of the qualifications of a good mediator and how I fulfill those qualifications, I will space them out over time.

Good Mediators are attorneys. I have been a full time practicing California attorney since 2001. I am authorized to appear before the California Supreme Court, Northern District of California and the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Therefore I am able to approach a problem looking at the legal issues besides working the parties and their attorneys to resolve those issues.

Good Mediators realize that mediation is much more complex than litigation. In litigation you can just follow the law and ignore personalities and their problems. Many times, there is only one dispute initially presented in mediation, but once mediation there are many legal and non-legal issues that need to be resolved before a global solution can be reached.

Good Mediators have acquired excellent mediation skills. I have hundreds of hours of direct mediation training. I have taught 40-hour and 25-hour mediation classes. Members of the classes have included bench officers (Judges). I have mentored other mediators. I have made many California MCLE presentations on mediation. MCLE is continuing education for attorneys. I have conducted over a thousand mediations with a very high success rate. These have included appellant mediations as well. These are cases where one party has already ‘won’ and they were sent out to mediation by the Court of Appeal.

Ken_Strongman_003smAbout the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.

FAQ: What is the format of a mediation?

 Arbritration, FAQ, Mediation  Comments Off on FAQ: What is the format of a mediation?
Jul 212014
 

Angel Island SP - format of mediation

The format of the mediation is flexible

What is the format of a mediation?

What is the format of a mediation? The process is entirely flexible and will depend on the mediator and the parties’ preferences. In general terms, it is preferable that position papers are exchanged in advance. Depending on what stage in the dispute the mediation takes place, it may be appropriate for the parties to agree to exchange relevant documents in advance. If possible, the parties and their legal representatives should meet the mediator themselves prior to the scheduled date of the mediation in order to assist the mediator identify the disputed key issues in advance.

On the day of the mediation usually there is a joint session at the beginning when the mediator brings the parties together in order to emphasize the ground rules and if agreed, to have opening presentations by each party. Often this can provide an opportunity for either party to articulate their own perspective of a dispute in their own terms and equally importantly, to hear the other party articulate their perspective. This presentation can be made by the party themselves and/or by their legal representative.

Thereafter, a mediator will usually meet privately with the parties in order to explore issues and possible areas of agreement and engage in a form of shuttle diplomacy. The mediator may propose further joint sessions or meetings between principals either with or without legal representatives. Ultimately, the objective is that the form of a resolution will come from the parties themselves to be formalized in a settlement agreement.

If it is not possible to resolve the issue at mediation, the mediator will typically offer their services to the parties for a period thereafter to facilitate any further discussions. This can be particularly useful if the parties have reached agreement on all but a few outstanding issues.

Ken_Strongman_003smAbout the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.

FAQ: Can you settle a case after a jury has decided a case?

 Arbritration, FAQ, Mediation  Comments Off on FAQ: Can you settle a case after a jury has decided a case?
Jun 232014
 

Silverton, post jury settlements

Post Jury settlements

Can you settle a case after a jury has decided a case? As part of my full spectrum of dispute resolution services, I offer Appellate Mediation. My considerable experience in this area started in 2007.  I currently serve on the mediation panels for the First and Third Districts of the California Court of Appeal.  In addition to these panels, I now provide appellate mediation privately as well.

What is Appellate Mediation and When Does it Occur?

Appellate mediation focuses on cases that are on appeal or that are ready to go to appeal. Mediating a case that has gone all the way to appeal is not easy. The fact that a case has gone that far indicates that it was not one that was very amenable to settlement or mediation in the first place. Furthermore, an imbalance in power comes into play when the prevailing party in the trial court has the trial court’s decision on its side. By the time the case reaches appeal, there may be hard feelings coming from the trial, and the prospects of reaching a mediated resolution may seem daunting, but they are not impossible. Despite these difficulties I enjoy a success rate is high.
Sometimes the parties have tried mediation at the lower court level.  In one of my cases, the parties had gone to mediation twice, attended four mandatory settlement conferences with the judge, and completed a trial by jury. Both parties appealed the decision under different grounds. The case resolved in appellate mediation.
It is best that the mediation occur shortly after the appeal is lodged in order to save time, money, and effort.

Benefits of Appellate Mediation after court or jury decision

By using me as your Appellant Mediator you can speed case resolution and reduce litigation costs. Furthermore, you avoid the prospect of presenting your appeal to a sitting appellate judge as part of a settlement conference. I am able to provide the best possible assistance in resolving complex disputes without further litigation. I have the critical skills for handling the most intractable and contentious conflicts, regardless of subject matter.

Why Is Appellate Mediation Effective?

Joey Naylor: “Dad, why is the American government the best government?”
Nick Naylor: “Because of our endless appeals process.”
~Thank You For Smoking, 2005. [Emphasis added]
“It ain’t over ’til it’s over.”
~Yogi Berra, 1973
These quotes sum up the need for Appellate Mediation. Even though a party may have a judgment from a court that does not mean that litigation is over. If a party appeals, then the litigation continues. It is costly in time, money, and opportunity costs to all parties.
Appellate Courts generally can make several types of rulings. But none these rulings occur until after all parties spend considerable time and money preparing for the appeal. The court can affirm the judgment in which case the losing party can appeal to a higher court continuing the appeal process. The court can send the matter back down to a lower court with instructions. Then you are back litigating in the lower court. The court can order a new trial. In this case you get to start from the beginning and litigate the issues all over again.
There are also lost opportunity costs. For example in a business dispute, you may eventually win, but by then the industry has evolved making the dispute meaningless. This is especially true in emerging industries such as high tech.

Ken_Strongman_003smAbout the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.

FAQ: How to propose mediation?

 Arbritration, FAQ, Mediation  Comments Off on FAQ: How to propose mediation?
May 122014
 

FAQ_Mediation Mendocino 01 propose

When to propose mediation?

A Judge may recommend that the parties consider mediation or, more commonly, one party may simply propose, through their legal representatives to the other party and their legal representative, that the dispute be mediated. A proposal to mediate should not be seen as a weakness but merely as a willingness to explore the possibility of a resolution outside the procedural confines of litigation.

Many contracts contain mediation clauses.  The purpose of the mediation clause is to require a good faith attempt at resolving any contractual disputes before litigation is initiated.  If there is no mediation clause, the parties can still attempt to resolve their contractual dispute before commencing litigation.

If no contract exists or it is as dispute arising out of a tort such as a personal injury, there is no reason not to suggest mediation.

Ken_Strongman_003smAbout the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.

FAQ: How to propose mediation?

 Arbritration, FAQ, Mediation  Comments Off on FAQ: How to propose mediation?
Apr 282014
 

Philmont Scout Ranch propose

How to propose mediation.

How to Propose Mediation – Options

A Judge may recommend that the parties consider mediation or, more commonly, one party may simply propose, through their legal representatives to the other party and their legal representative, that the dispute be mediated. A proposal to mediate should not be seen as a weakness but merely as a willingness to explore the possibility of a resolution outside the procedural confines of litigation.

Many contracts contain mediation clauses.  The purpose of the mediation clause is to require a good faith attempt at resolving any contractual disputes before litigation is initiated.  If there is no mediation clause, the parties can still attempt to resolve their contractual dispute before commencing litigation.

If no contract exists or it is as dispute arising out of a tort such as a personal injury, there is no reason not to suggest mediation.

Ken_Strongman_003smAbout the Author: Ken Strongman (www.kpstrongman.com) has years of experience and a growing national reputation as a mediator and arbitrator.  He has successfully resolved more than a thousand disputes in the fields of construction defects, real estate, intellectual property, and employment.  He is also a Mediator and Arbitrator for FINRA.

© 2020 Ken Strongman. All Rights Reserved. Please do not copy or repost without permission.